Thanks to everyone who made it out to the Senior Show at UTC Tuesday night. Your support of the show means a lot to our class.

For all of you that couldn’t make it out, I thought I would post some images of how the show turned out. There is more to see than what I can address in a blog, so if you can make it, I would highly recommend stopping by the Cress Gallery of Art at UTC before the show is taken down April 28th.

I thought this show had a much more organic/natural feeling to it in comparison to Show One’s high contrast and vibrant colors. Upon entering the gallery, an organic feeling is inspired beginning with my sculpture positioned in the front left floor space having live ivy and soft light reflecting off of frosted Plexiglas.

Conflicted - Jessi Taylor

"Conflicted" - Jessi Taylor

Directly behind me low on the floor, Jean Pitts’ bisqued ceramic installation reminded me of a dry riverbed with rounded stones smoothed out by decades of rushing water.

"Familiar" - Jean Pitts

"Familiar" - Jean Pitts

The positioning of the ceramic vessels lead beautifully to the “10” panels and bookshelves leaning against the opposite wall. The panels where created using a system of rules inspired by the Ten Commandments of the Bible.

"10" - Michael Mahaffey & Stephanie Tate

"10" - Michael Mahaffey & Stephanie Tate

The warm color palette and lightness of the panels is reflected nicely in the next two pieces. The first is an ethereal series of drawings by McKinley Bryson on vellum which have an extraordinary play on light and shadow. The second is a series of oil paintings by Tom Shaw, positioned across the room from the “10” panels.

"673780s." - McKinley Bryson

"673780s." - McKinley Bryson

Individually Titled - Thomas Shaw

Individually Titled - Thomas Shaw


Conflicted, detail image

A few people have mentioned that they would have liked to have seen my presentation of Conflicted. So here are a few of my more explanatory slides and my complete artist’s statement for you to view at your convenience.

Conflicted

Everyday we make inconsequential choices: milk or orange juice? black shoes or brown shoes? Usually these split second decisions can be made with little hesitation.

However, some choices can be conflicting. These choices require something from us. They necessitate a commitment of our time, our finances or our intelligence. Commitments come in many forms by way of family, friends, faith, health, business, school or recreation. How do you determine your commitments? When should you say yes? When should you say no? The answer will vary as often as you ask the question.

However, each commitment a person chooses to make or chooses not to make will take them in one of two directions. The first direction is one of simplification, and the second is one of complication. The outcome of either direction can be positive or negative. This is entirely dependent on the person making the decision.

For myself, these types of decisions can lead to a lengthy mental struggle. A struggle between my social side that needs to be dependable and productive and my melancholy side which craves solitude and stillness. I could not exclude one side anymore than I could survive in complete isolation or thrive under a constant onslaught of pressure to perform.

This sculpture is a physical representation of an internal conflict. The ring of ivy represents a need for simplicity, a pared down existence outside of obligation. Ivy is a simple plant to maintain. It is a quiet natural element that needs only basic nutrition to grow and a temperate environment to thrive. In contrast, the composition of acrylic rectangles represents the complexity that results from multiple commitments. This juxtaposition of natural and synthetic elements speaks to a need for balance and perhaps, at least in my circumstance, the need for conflict to create balance.

The Process - Conflicted

Thanks - Conflicted



I know there are several of you who can’t make it to the show before the work is taken down on April 28th. So, here are some images of the completed sculpture. Enjoy!

Conflicted, mixed media sculpture

Conflicted, sculpture, reverse side

Conflicted, sculpture


Conflicted

Here is a hint of the mixed media sculpture that I’m showing tomorrow night at the Cress Gallery of Art at UTC and a sample from my Artist Statement:

This sculpture is a physical representation of an internal conflict. The ring of ivy represents a need for simplicity, a pared down existence outside of obligation. Ivy is a simple plant to maintain. It is a quiet natural element that needs only basic nutrition to grow and a temperate environment to thrive. In contrast, the composition of acrylic rectangles represents the complexity that results from multiple commitments. This juxtaposition of natural and synthetic elements speaks to a need for balance and perhaps, at least in my circumstance, the need for conflict to create balance.

If you would like to hear more about my artist statement come to the presentation on April 14th at 4:00 PM and to the see rest of the sculpture come to the reception on the same day at 5:30 PM.


There has been a lot of activity in the last 36 hours revolving around the Cress Gallery of Art at UTC (The Univeristy of Tennessee at Chattanooga). It’s nearly time for the opening of the second installment of the Senior Exhibition, which means, tomorrow night is my big night! April 14th at 5:30 PM, I will be showing my senior thesis work at the Cress Gallery, along with ten other seniors in the BFA program at UTC. I will also be one of the seven seniors from the graphic design concentration that will be giving project presentations at 4:00 PM.

The first installation of the Senior Exhibition on March 31st was a huge success with standing-room only at the 4:00 PM presentations and a lobby full of people at the 5:30 PM reception.

Here are a couple of photos from the first show:

Cress Gallery of Art Senior Exhibition: Show One

Cress Gallery of Art Senior Exhibition: Show One


In my previous post on the WaSP InterAct project I talked specifically about my branding for the InterAct Curriculum, but I did not get into the specifics of the actual functioning of the Curriculum. The broad view is that the WaSP InterAct Curriculum framework is a living Curriculum designed for collegiate level professors to use in teaching web design and development courses. Because the Curriculum is considered ‘living’ it can be used as little or as much as desired by the professor and it is also updated regularly to keep up with an ever-changing and advancing industry.

Recently the writers of the InterAct Cirriculum have been talking about it. For more details visit Christopher Schmitt’s blog. He gives a great rundown of the material offered in the WaSP InterAct Curriculum. Or you can listen to Aarron Walter’s interview on Boagworld, which is a great podcast by Paul Boag and Marcus Lillington on all things relating to building and running websites.


WaSP InterAct

02Apr09

Get Connected banner

I love being a designer. I like the challenge of putting together a visual puzzle and creating a cohesive whole out of a tangle of assorted elements. In varying degrees, all design projects present these opportunities. But some projects offer more than just the fun of assembling an aesthetically pleasing design. The WaSP InterAct project gave me a great opportunity to design, but it also gave me a mission that I could really experience and support.

I have to admit, when I started this project with my rock star of a mentor, Leslie Jensen-Inman, I didn’t really get it. I knew that the project was important; what I didn’t understand was that this project was huge!

I began working with The Web Standards Project Education Task Force (WaSP Edu TF) in October of 2008. [The WaSP Edu TF is a branch of The Web Standards Project devoted to advancing the adoption of W3C Web Standards in the realm of education.]

My job was to create a friendly and welcoming brand for a collegiate level web curriculum being written by the super talented crew of the WaSP Edu TF. From the beginning, the name that we were working with was: The Web Standards Project Education Task Force Curriculum Framework or WaSP Edu TF Curriculum Framework for short. This was a bit daunting; I think it took me a week just to remember the order of the title.

For a while I tried to focus on the more accessible ‘task force’ portion of the name, singling this out as a call to action.

WaSP Edu Task Force

This option didn’t work out at all because it wasn’t in the least bit friendly or welcoming. Too much “standards or else!” not enough “how may I help you?”

At this point, Jesen-Inman, acting as creative director, wisely suggested we try renaming the curriculum. First we condensed down the mission of the WaSP Edu TF into a four word tagline: Connecting Education and Industry.  We agonized over the name a while longer. It needed to be a call to action but not too forceful, inviting but not formal, and something that related well with the tagline but wasn’t redundant. ‘Interact’ fit the bill perfectly, hitting all the right notes with our mission and even referencing the target audiences in interactive web education and industry.

After some more agonizing over visual representation, I had a moment of clarity in the form of learning a new command key shortcut. Command key shortcuts are tools that just make life easier and I thought that sentiment felt appropriate for the new WaSP InterAct Curriculum. So I used that shape to form a new mark that would loop around and in on itself, creating an interconnected pathway. It all came together to look like this:

WaSP InterAct Logo

Once the look of the brand was decided things began to come together quickly in the form of collateral. First came the website that the curriculum is hosted on.

WaSP InterAct Curriculum Framework

Then we had to really speed it up for the promotional materials for South by Southwest Interactive 2009, which was the platform we used to launch the curriculum. Of course there where business cards to be made, and because of the fun atmosphere of the SXSW conference I wanted to do something really bright and eye-catching for our invites and our buttons, it all came together like this:

InterAct Collateral

So it’s really just the beginning for WaSP InterAct and we’ll see where it takes us. Hopefully it will include a connected community of web professionals and educators with a better prepared group of web students and graduates.

InterAct Pattern Footer




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